Twin Peaks: The 1990s Return

No Homers!

Stonecutters as Bookhouse Boys

TWIN PEAKS is probably the most important television show of the 1990s, its byzantine exposition and use of dream logic made it the most watched TV show week-after-week for the better part of a year. Even after the series’ decline and demise its dark tone and mysterious aesthetic helped create the idea of Event Television, and birthed copycats for years. But for all of Twin Peaks’ lauded experimentalism and high-art aspirations, the public—and even some hardcore aficionados—forget that a big part of its formula is borrowed from the basest broadcast trash: soap operas.

Twin Peaks is the child of Dallas and General Hospital, with The Twilight Zone as its wary but encouraging stepfather. If you pay attention too intently, too seriously, Twin Peaks is a nightmare full of monsters and unfathomable imagery, where inscrutable gods rain mayhem upon a small town, leaving misery in their path. If you put the show in context as an ongoing serial drama with an ensemble cast of impeccable beauties, though, its oversized characters and tangle of quick-changing wacky plots, the [original] series adds up to a pretty frothy but conventional soap opera. There isn’t a plot that Twin Peaks used that hasn’t been done by some network or premium drama.

I thought you were dead?!

Search for the Sun as
Invitation to Love

When asked by The Guardian if his show was a parody Lynch obstinately replied, “No, no, no, no, no. It is a soap opera. Soap operas grow out of life and because they’re continuing stories you get to go deeper into the characters’ lives.”

Similarly, The Simpsons, for all its vaunted skewering of cliché TV tropes, works very well as a conventional family sitcom. What made the FOX show stand out in 1989 was the high quality of the writing, with the novelty of animation sprinkled atop. Matt Groening has said on episode commentaries that he didn’t want to exploit the latitude offered by cartoons in a way that’d prevent viewers from identifying with the family and their world. As bright and colorful as The Simpsons is, there isn’t much Looney Tunes-style reality defying, or Flintstones-esque anachronistic mise-en-scene (at least, not much of that at the height of the series run).

trembling

Life in Hell
Matt Groening 1990

Fans of Groening’s LIFE IN HELL comics know he’s an astute observer of parent-child dynamics and the stress of modern life. Simpsons stories and humor come from observations of a very contemporary family (based loosely on Groening’s own home) and the community they live in, instead of recycling the bland jokes found on Family Matters, or the sunny platitudes of The Cosby Show.

Twin Peaks and The Simpsons seem wildly different from each other, as certainly as they were different from anything else on television in the early 1990s. Where the two

Brillant habe ich keine Ahnung, was los ist

Smither’s Sycophantic German tapes
as Cooper’s tape recorder

programs grow together though, are their well rendered casts. The leads in Twin Peaks and The Simpsons are compelling and iconic, they’re designed to be understood quickly. We can identify Bart’s spiky silhouette and Cooper’s mannequin-like beauty, Marge’s beehive hairdo and Audrey’s classic glamour on sight. It’s the minor cast members though who carry the weight of bringing their small towns to life, making an impact and remaining memorable after just a few appearances. Springfield would feel barren if Moe’s Bar didn’t have a constant handful of worn down patrons, or if Grandpa Simpson didn’t have a Jasper to gripe with. Bit players, like Disco Stu, Prof. Frink or Hans Moleman, make Springfield come alive when they kick in a punchline and fill out the scene backgrounds. Similarly, the malevolence acting upon Twin Peaks wouldn’t stab with such intensity if the cast didn’t feel not just quirky, but like real people you might know.

Both David Lynch and Matt Groening come from “Small Town America.” Lynch was

pie and coffee

Jittery Joe’s as
The Double R Diner

born in Missoula, Montana, but moved around the Midwest a lot due to his father’s job with the Federal Department of Agriculture. He went to college in Philadelphia, PA, a culturally rich city with deep working class roots, where he lived in a rough industrial part of town. Groening grew up in Portland, Oregon when it was still a sleepy burg surrounded by the logging industry. His father, a graphic designer, and mother, a teacher, exemplified the practical application of creativity for their era. Matt didn’t leave home until after college, relocating at age 23 to Los Angeles.

Lynch’s public persona is that of a wide-eyed innocent, affecting a strong midwestern accent that contrasts the tropes associated with a contemporary artist or Hollywood elite. He dresses with cartoon-character-like consistency in a neat but drab black suit, hair puffed in a dated pompadour. Lynch is reluctant to talk about the personal meaning of his films, and once famously stalled an interview after declaring “Eraserhead is my most spiritual film,” then refused to elaborate why.

pained grimace

David Lynch, biography: “Born Missoula, Mont. Eagle Scout.”

Aside from their very different aesthetics, Groening and Lynch really aren’t that different. Both were Boy Scouts. Their art is grounded in an affectionate recollection of the small town America they grew up in—and both critical of it too, the shows share a core interest in examining the values and failings of the family in community life. Both creators never stop working. They are auteurs able to wield tremendous power over their projects even with creative partners and within the cautious Hollywood system. They’re clearly the force behind what we see after their name comes on screen.

paralyzed with rage

The Angriest Dog in the World
David Lynch’s alt comic strip

It’s 2017, and this year Twin Peaks has returned to television as a premium event with David Lynch still the central creative force and final word. Interestingly, it is competing against other prestige television such as Game of Thrones and Mr. Robot,

Just yooooou aaaannnd Iiiiii

Ned Flanders & The Larry Davis Experience
as Julie Cruz & Angelo Badalamenti

the very kind of must-see event shows he laid the groundwork for 25 years ago. Matt Groening is also creating new television, having spent the past year developing DISENCHANTMENT, a cartoon that sounds like a richer take on Rocky & Bullwinkle’s Fractured Fairy Tales. It will premiere on Netflix late next year. He’ll be reentering a field now filled with a generation of creators who were inspired by him, like Bob Wakberg’s Bojack Horseman, Rebecca Sugar’s Steven Universe, and Pendleton Ward’s Adventure Time. Goening and Lynch’s strong personal vision, and restless creative energy suggests that both are still innovative, and that they’re going to be well suited to the contemporary landscape they helped create.

Laura, clue, Laura, clue, Laura, clue . . .

Clue Pigeon as Waldo

Posted in Classic Simpsons, Contemporary, Cultural Impact, Matt Groening, Movies, recasting, The Simpsons, TV | Tagged , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Simpsons Joke Origins: Superstar Celebrity Microphone

CONVOY!

Do you have any of those microphones left?!
A couple.

The episode Radio Bart centers around Bart being given a toy microphone for his birthday, and the pranks he uses it for. These start innocently enough with him tricking Homer into believing an alien invasion is happening, or ordering the Flanders children around in God’s voice, but he gets in real trouble when he drops it down a well and pretends to be a trapped boy.

I created the universe!

What do you mean how did I get on the radio!?

But did you know that his Superstar Celebrity microphone was based on a real product called Mr. Microphone? And the ad Homer sees showing a man using it to obnoxiously catcall women from his car was straight from the real-life commercial? But don’t take my word for it – see for yourself.

These toys were readily available at through magazine ad mailorder and Radioshack stores for decades. Like those shopping options, Mr. Microphone is sadly hard to find today, but the fun lives on in spirit through karaoke.

destroy the radio industry

Classic

Hey good lookin', I'll be back for you later!

1970s glory days

Now, this piece of crap probably has a range of only several yards at best, so I doubt that Bart could realistically speak into the mic at home and have it audible from the radio in the well blocks away, but I’m more than willing to believe a wizard did it.

Posted in Classic Simpsons, Cultural Impact, joke origins, TV | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Wide & Tall: The Rock Bottom Interview

awe crap.

Tonight on Rock Bottom

It’s time for another patented Flim Springfield hard hitting Rock Bottom investigative interview!

♪ I AM THE VERY MODEL OF A MODERN MAJOR GENERAL ♪

from Wide and Tall Simpsons Caps, from “Deep Space Homer” (S5, Ep15)

“Who are you, and what are you doing in my house?” …Tell us who you are, and what you do?

♪ HE'S HARDLY EVER SICK AT SEA... ♪

Steven, he’s English!

I’m Steven, English, 26 years old and I run “Wide and Tall Simpsons Caps” a site that specializes in self stitched together tall and wide frames. (I also have a Futurama side blog that does the same.)

“It happened at the beginning of that turbulent decade known as the 80s” …When did you first watch The Simpsons? What early episode/joke do you remember?

Steven: Wow, a long time ago now that I think about it. The mid 90’s, somewhere from 95-96, we had access to ‘Sky’ and then it started showing on the BBC. A first episode is tough to pin down, I more remember that it was something I watched than the specific episodes but it would have been one from the ‘Classic’ era. I have a recall of watching ‘Marge in Chains’, that ‘Mad’ fold in joke I found very creepy at the time, aside from that, Bart dancing in that bright red dress!

“I’m not a bloody jukebox!” …What’s your favorite musical moment from The Simpsons (either original song, or ‘real’ tune used on the show) what makes it memorable?

Steven: The song I took my blog name from! Lisa’s folksy protest tune in ‘Last Exit to Springfield’.  I’ve always loved that she sits there to support her dad who’s doing it she so can have proper braces, the bond between them is so sweet. It’s perhaps the least complex song they ever did, a few chords, repeated chorus but it’s as powerful as the rest because of the depth of feeling behind it.

“$18 bucks for this? What a rip-off!” …Do you or have you ever owned any Simpsons tchotchkes? Shirts, trading cards, DVDs, action figures, ‘hand-drawn animation cells guaranteed to increase in value’, etc… what’s your favorite legit or bootleg stuff?

SHADDUP!

(Office locked, Harvard mug denied.)

Steven: It’s funny you ask, as it’s the Easter period my Simpson’s mug has just turned 13 years old! It came with an Easter egg and I’ve used it almost every single day for tea. Amazingly I’ve never owned any Simpson’s DVD’s (bar the movie, that’s floating around somewhere), it’s to my eternal shame really but there on TV so often it’s not a pressing need. I’ve owned a few of the console games, ‘Hit and Run’ and the like but the most infamous and infuriating has to be ‘Simpson’s Wrestling’, stupid Flanders….

“We should thank our lucky stars they’re still putting on a program of this caliber after so many years” …Which season of Classic Simpsons is the best? In your opinion, when did the classic era end or what was the last good episode?

Steven: Interestingly I’ve just finished putting together my ‘Perfect Season’ by ranking the episodes of each season against one another, Season Six had most episode’s in the Season but statistically Season Three had the best average result and I’m nothing but a slave to numbers so I’ll go with Season Three. Most people will agree that Eight was the last ‘Classic’ season but it had its fair share of bad episodes (and a few classics), even during Seven signs of decay kicking in can be seen. The last good episode post Eight is Season Nine’s ‘Lisa’s Sax’ which had in fact been held over from Eight, beyond that, Season Nine and Ten’s episodes are incredibly hit and miss. I’ve only watched a handful past that.

“There were script problems from day one” …Do you ever watch Simpsons with commentary on? What’s the neatest thing you’ve learned from the crew…

Steven: As mentioned no commentaries because no DVD’s, however I read an awful lot. During the period just after Sam Simon’s passing I read an interesting quote from David Silverman, he claimed that originally directors weren’t going to be credited prominently for their work as Simon didn’t think they made much of a difference but he wanted his work acknowledged, so Simon asked him to prove why it should be.

Silverman offers a balanced view of Simon. “He was a hard guy. He was a really tough guy,” Silverman tells Comic Riffs. “He gave me a dismissive hand at first.”

Silverman’s first episode was ‘Bart the General’, an episode littered with excellent direction. He got his credit. I always think this was what helped make the show so great, the fact they had to work so hard on what they did, because success wasn’t a given, it’s the main component the show lacks now. I mean where’s the drive when you when know you won’t ever be cancelled?

Thanks for letting us interview you Steven–and for not attacking our reporter! Simpsons fans, do yourself a favor and check our bythebigcoolingtower.tumblr.com for his very interesting look at background cell artwork, an overlooked aspect of classic animation.

Posted in Classic Simpsons, Contemporary, Cultural Impact, fan art, interview, The Simpsons | Tagged , , | Leave a comment

June Trivia Recap & A Visit to LA’s Stonecutters!

June has been a long hot month here in Arizona, and we just managed to eke out one more Trivia contest before Mr. Sun arrived in Phoenix to do its job on us.

mmmm, free goo

IT BLOWS…
the air conditioner store

Unfortunately . . . at the last minute co-host Diana and I had to go to Los Angeles for a fantastic offer we couldn’t turn down…

sounds like you're working for your car man

A vehicle that doesn’t hurt mother Earth.

More on that down the road.

What’s important is that we didn’t have to cancel the Bi-Mon-Sci-Fi-Con edition of Classic Simpsons Trivia at The Coronado! Diana and I want to give a heartfelt thank you to the Coronado’s Stephen Chevalier, The Klute, and our longtime tri-host Alex Cardwell, who all agreed at the last minute to fill in so we could road-trip to Knoxville Los Angeles!

Before we regale you with our thrilling adventure in the City of Broken Dreams though, let’s recap Sun City’s Simpsons contest: By all accounts the show was fun, everyone had a great time, and there was an AWESOME drink special…

A joint venture of Matsumura Fishworks and Tamaribuchi Heavy Manufacturing Concern.

The Fishbulb!
from The Coronado bar!

Winners…

 

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Here’s some sample questions from the contest, for you to test yourself against (Highlight between the parentheses to discover the answers):

  • Whose mother said, “We’ve tried nothing, and we’re all out of ideas!”
    (Mona Flanders, Ned’s Mom)
  • Adam West feels that these three actresses are the only true Catwoman.
    (Julie Newmar, Lee Meriwether, Eartha Kitt)
  • This person has a Starland Vocal Band on their upper arm. (Homer)
  • This is Comic Book Guy’s car’s license plate number as seen in the episode “Viva
  • Ned Flanders.” It is also the registration number of the original USS Enterprise.
    (NCC-1701)
  • What phone number do you call if you want to hire Mr. Plow? (Klondike 5-3226)
  • What movie did this robot star in:
that poor midget

(CLANK CLANK YOU’RE DEAD)

Simpsons Trivia is now on hiatus for a Summer break! We’ll have updates on that soon, but first…Los Angeles! Diana and I love to explore new cities together, we’ve been to Brockway, Ogdenville, North Haverbrook, as well as Portland OR, Lake Havasu AZ (home of London Bridge), San Francisco, and South Korea among other fun places! We can’t help but keep an eye open for Simpsons-related fun on these trips.

LA and Hollywood are ripe with places and people who’ve been joked about on the show. We got to see the former location of the Brown Derby, Lupe Velez’s star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame, and stumbled across this along the way…

all this plus a belching contest award

Future tour guide: “Who were The Simpsons
and what did they do to deserve a star
on the Hollywood Walk of Fame?”

We also…

 

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But the highlight of the trip was attending Stonecutters LA Trivia at MELTDOWN Comics, hosted by the funny folks from Nerdist! Stonecutters Trivia LA is similar to our Simpsons trivia show. It has three co-hosts, it’s free, designed for teams, has multiple rounds, and awards are given for the best team name in addition to 1st-2nd-3rd place. It’s different in that Stonecutters show cartoons between each round while the quizmasters tally the scores themselves, and it’s held in a makeshift theater instead of a restaurant.

 

 

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Diana and I teamed with our good friend Erica, who moved to LA a couple years ago. We turned her onto The Simpsons, and now she’d helping us navigate Tinseltown. We arrived at Meltdown, a friendly and brightly-lit comic shop (no Comic Book Guy in sight), and I got to browse around the place where I’ll probably be spending a lot of future Wednesdays.

The hosts are very entertaining, there’s good-natured back-and-forth between them, and the crowd too. Everyone who comes is there to have fun and share in the camaraderie of our favorite TV institution. Winning is a second place concern.

In fact, we came in second place, taking home some great swag: the complete first season of MacGyver, an Iron Giant figurine, and of course the respect and admiration of our social betters. We highly recommend attending the show if you ever find yourself in Los Angeles.

* * *

I’ve been swamped with work, and am behind on updates and posts. I’ll be working over July to get caught up though. We’ve got another Rock Bottom Profile, a new Joke Origin, and if I can finish it, the second part of my look back at Twin Peaks and the interesting ways it compares to The Simpsons. Thanks for reading and sharing what we do at Flim Springfield. ~JRC

Posted in Classic Simpsons, comic books, Contemporary, food, live show, The Simpsons, trivia, Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , | Leave a comment

Twin Peaks: I Have Absolutely No Idea What’s Going On

poster

TWIN PEAKS runs neck and neck for “most important TV series of the 1990s” alongside The Simpsons. Each program defined the decade in which they were created, in their own way. Completely different, and seemingly impossible to imagine actually making it to broadcast, both shows caught people with a breath of fresh air, or a sock to the stomach.

For our recasting, we tried to stick with characters found only the first season–and frankly we didn’t catch every one. A handful of our choices are no-brainers, and one or two will probably cause some furring of brows in a vain attempt to understand our reasoning. There will be a follow-up post, however, with some of the settings, incidentals, and other interesting touches that David Lynch and Mark Frost built into the show, and how they might be remixed using The Simpsons.

Sherri as Laura Palmer

Sherri as Laura Palmer
(Sheryl Lee)
She’s full of secrets, such as
“My sister likes you.”

Fox Mulder as Dale Cooper

Fox Mulder as Special Agent Dale Cooper (Kyle MacLachlan)
The unsolved mysteries of
‘Unsolved Mysteries!’

The Simpsons outlasted Twin Peaks’ short 2 season run, but longevity isn’t the same as impact, and the fact that Showtime has brought the series back only shows how unforgettable it was. Since it went off the air, Twin Peaks’ impact on television has proved lasting and dynamic, from its popularity leading to the creation of shows like X-Files and Northern Exposure, to the many many times it has been parodied and alluded to on other programs and in other media.

Bait Shop Clerk as Pete

Bait shop geezer as
Pete Martell (Jack Nance)
If you ask me, and most people do, she’s dead, wrapped in plastic.

Lenny as Sheriff Truman

Lenny as Harry Truman (Michael Ontkean)
“…I love you Sheriff Truman.”
Lenny, like Harry, might be the most loved man in their respective towns.

Twin Peaks, like The Simpsons, proved the value of giving idiosyncratic creators freedom. Like I LOVE LUCY, and THE TWILIGHT ZONE before it, many hands work to make a television program, but these succeeded because of the vision and instinct of their auteur directors. Much of modern small screen programing is now built around this format (and again, Twin Peaks has come back, specifically thanks to that evolution).

Homer as Leo Johnson

Homer Simpson as Leo Johnson
(Eric Da Re)
Homer needs a new pair of Chili boots!

Lurleen Lumpkin as Shelly Johnson

Lurleen Lumpkin as Shelly Johnson (Madchen Amick)
Waitresses in diners are not often compared to goddesses.

The Fox Network has always been willing to take chances on strange ideas, to varying degrees of success. This is personified most by The X-Files, but also with programs like the self-destructing sitcom GET A LIFE from Chris Elliott and David Mirkin, and David E. Kelley’s magical realist office-based fairy tale ALLY McBEAL, among others. The Simpsons itself now invites guest auteurs and artists in, giving them free rein to create the show’s opening credit sequence.

Lionel Hutz as Leland Palmer

Lionel Hutz as Leland Palmer (Ray Wise)
Dumpster Fire Walk With Me.

Hank Scoripio as Ben Horne

Hank Scorpio as Benjamin Horne
(Richard Beymer)

“Sometimes the urge to do bad is nearly overpowering.”

Herman as Mike (the one armed man)

Herman as Philip Gerard AKA Mike AKA “The One-Armed Man” (Al Strobel)
As soon as BOB gets here the party will begin.

Raving Derelict as Bob

Raving Derelict as
BOB (Frank Silva)
Sometimes raving derelicts
make the most sense.

Crazy Cat lady as Log Lady

The Cat Lady as The Log Lady
(Catherine Coulson)

…can anyone who loves trees that much really be crazy?

Old Jewish Man as Waiter

The Old Jewish Man as
The Waiter (Hank Worden)

♪The old gray waiter ain’t what he used to be♪

Tall Man as The Giant

The Very Tall Man as
The Giant (Carel Struyken)
Do you find something ominous about my looming appearance?

Handsome Pete as The Man from Another Place

Handsome Pete as
The Man from Another Place
(Michael Anderson)
“.sruoh rof gnicnad eb ll’eh ,rrraD”

I like Miguel Ferrer because he voiced Death on Adventure Time. RIP

Rex Banner as Agent Albert Rosenfield (Miguel Ferrer)
He won’t hit you like Rex, but Albert probably won’t kiss you goodbye either.

Grandpa as Gordon Cole

Grandpa as Agent Gordon Cole
(David Lynch)
“FRENCH TOAST, PLEASE!”

Jessica L as Audrey H

Jessica Lovejoy as
Audrey Horne (Sherilyn Fenn)

Both expelled from boarding school, probably.

Dolph as Bobby Briggs

Dolph as Bobby Briggs
(Dana Ashbrook)
“Rebellion in a young man your age is a necessary fact of life, and, candidly, a sign of strength.”

Library boy as James Hurley

That boy who works in the library
as James Hurley

(James Marshall)
“If only someone could tame him.”

Laura Powers as Donna Hayward

Laura Powers as Donna Hayward
(Lara Flynn Boyle)
Her upbringing was painfully strict.

Samantha Stanky as Lucy Moran

Samantha Stanky as Lucy Moran
(Kimmy Robertson)

Well aware of the lackluster police force.

Squeaky Voiced Teen as Dep Andy Brennan

Squeaky Voiced Teen as
Deputy Andy (Harry Goaz)
If he had a girlfriend, she’d kill him.

Apu as Hawk

Apu as Deputy Hawk
(Michael Horse)
I am Apu Nahasapeemapetilon,
I play Tommy Hill.

Hans Moleman as Mayor Milford

Hans Moleman as Mayor Milford
(John Boylan)

Being Mayor has ruined my life,
I’m 31 years old!

Edna as Nadine Hurley

Edna Krabappel as Nadine Hurley
(Wendy Robie)

Both should probably be spending less time around schools.

Skinner as Big Ed Hurley

Principal Skinner as “Big Ed”
Hurley (Everett McGill)

“To poor decisions.”

Ruth Powers as Norma Jennings

Ruth Powers as Norma Jennings
(Peggy Lipton)

When my husband went to jail he took all my money, along with the car, my youth, my faith in mankind.

Marge as Sarah Palmer

Marge as Sarah Palmer
(Grace Zabriskie)
NOOOOOOOOOOOO!

Cookie Kwan as Josie Packard

Cookie Kwan as Josie Packard (Joan Chen)
Unlike Josie, Cookie wears her menace like a red blazer, but they’re both dangerous.

Agnes Skinner as Catherine Martell

Agnes Skinner as Catherine Martell
(Piper Laurie)

You’re not principal of the saw mill, and you never will be.

Terri as Madeline

Terri as “Maddy” Ferguson (Sheryl Lee)
“Oooh twins! Which one’s the evil one?”

Ralph has Johnny Horne

Ralph as Johnny Horne
(Robert Bauer)
Lost Boy

Marvin Monro as Dr Jacobie

Dr. Marvin Monroe as Dr. Jacoby 
(Russ Tamblyn)

The problems of our entire society are of a sexual nature, and can be solved with
cartoon violence.

DrHibbert as Doc Hayward

Dr. Hibbert as Dr. Hayward (Warren Frost)
This comparison only works with Classic Era Hibbert.

Luann as Betty Briggs

Maude as Betty Briggs
(Charlotte Stewart)
A spiritual woman, loving to her family, and a bit out of touch.

Commandant as Major Briggs

Rommelwood Commandant as Major Briggs (Don Davis)
Surprisingly progressive considering his work.

Bell as Blackie

Belle as Blackie (Victoria Catlin)
I do love when you drop by, Agent Cooper…

Jacques as Jean Renault

Jacques as Jean Renault
(Michael Parks)
Getting by on their French accents and amorality.

Moe as Jacques Renault

Moe as Jacques Renault (Walter Olkewicz)
Who would have thought a whale could be so heavy? Ah cheese it, the Feds!

Snake as Hank

Snake as Hank Jennings (Chris Mulkey)
Paying his debt to society, as honestly as he pays off his student loans.

Moe as Jacques Renault

Original Sparkle as Ronette Pulaski 
(Phoebe Augustine)

You don’t want to know what happened to the Original Sparkle.

Disco Stu as Jerry Horne (David P. Kelly)
Stu, like Jerry, is a man with very specific tastes and aesthetics.

We hoped you like our take on Twin Peaks. If you have other ideas for who should play who, or characters we should have included, please put them in the comments below.

I’ll be back soon with a longer essay about the show, and a few more gifs to connect some of the places in Twin Peaks (both real and metaphysical) to the town of Springfield.

Posted in Classic Simpsons, Cultural Impact, gifs, recasting, The Simpsons, TV | Tagged , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

April Trivia Recap / Next Show Date!

April means two things in Arizona: Spring weather hanging on for a bow, and any excuse for a festival before the Sun fries us all. Oh, and trivia at The Coronado too of course!

April 29th was a fantastic night on the patio, we had a full house, with some incredibly knowledgeable teams, and Diana came up with an awesome mid-show solo competition…

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A Family Feud inspired survey/guess contest about some key Simpsons opinions: Funniest Episode*, Most Romantic Episode**, Most Attractive***, Best Musical Guest****, Best Homer Job (non-powerplant)*****.

Here’s the night’s team winners:

Fancy Walkers came in 1st place with 94 points!
Rank Amateurs Compared to Dr. Colossus did a pro job getting 92 points at 2nd place!
And, 3rd place went to Stop Stop He’s Already Dead with an 11 point gap for 81 total!

Here’s some sample questions to test yourself against (highlight in the parenthesis to see the answer):

  • In Bart on the Road, Martin falls asleep in the car and awakes to see what he believes is Canada’s vast fields of this. (Corn)
  • As shown in Mother Simpson, what rude inscription is on the tombstone Patty and Selma bought for Homer? (We Are Richer for Having Lost Him)
  • Whacking Day started as an excuse to use violence against what group of people?
    (The Irish)
  • In the episode “A Star is Burns,” what three people are shown taking a football to the groin? (Hans Moleman, Jay Sherman, George C. Scott)
come back!

Who is this?
(Joey Jo-Jo Junior Shabadoo)

We also introduced a new prize for the winner of each month’s Best Team Name contest. They now get to pick the theme for the next trivia show, in April The Electrified Fooling Machines have chosen Bi-Mon Sci-Fi-Con for the June trivia contest!

We’re taking May off to celebrate Phoenix Comicon, but we’ll be back at The Coronado on Saturday June 3rd for our next live trivia show!

June 2017 trivia

According to our exhaustive survey:
* You Only Move Twice
**The Way We Was
***Mindy Simmons
****Michael Jackson
*****Mr. Plow
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Coming Soon: Diane, 11:30 a.m., February Twenty-fourth…

That Gum You Like is Going to Come Back in Style…

Twin Peaks Poster Part9 (gif branded)

There’s been a lot of renewed interest in the early 1990s TV show Twin Peaks. I remember watching it in first run, friends and I spent hours puzzling over it mystery and obscure symbolism. I got to introduce my Film Cricket partner Diana to the show a couple years ago, and it is actually one of the big inspirations for this site.

Flim Springfield presents Cypress Creek, coming soon, hopefully before the sequel series premiers on Showtime!

twin-peaks-entertainment-weekly-simpsonized

from Entertainment Weekly,
via WelcomeToTwinPeaks.com

 

Vintage Simpsons TP recasting

(We’re not the first to think of this by a longshot.)

 

Twin Peaks Poster Part9point5 (jumpscare)

(jumpscare edit)

Check back, hmmm, let’s say next week.

Posted in Classic Simpsons, coming soon, Contemporary, Cultural Impact, fan art, simpsons in the news,, The Simpsons, TV | Tagged , , , , | Leave a comment